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20121201
20121231
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colleague from connecticut, rosa delauro, has introduced that bill year after year. you said that the federal government can borrow money, 10-year notes, even 15-year notes, somewhere around 1.5%, maybe toward 2%. if we were to borrow that, put it into an infrastructure bank and then loan money to infrastructure projects that have a cash flow, sanitation facility, water facility, toll bridges and numerous other kinds of infrastructure, which is desperately needed, we could have a financing system that over time would actually make money for the federal government. could borrow at 1.5%, loan at 1.75%, have a margin there, the money would flow back in. you'd get that revolving. the president has actually proposed this in his american jobs act. he's picked this up during his debate, the fiscal cliff negotiations, put it back on the table. we ought to be doing that. in doing so we will create tens of thousands, indeed hundreds of thousands of american jobs. american jobs. and if we couple that with buy american so that the equipment, the steel, the concrete, the other ingredients
, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story they want to share? i also come to this issue through personal experience. my younger brother was shot in a shooting that happened on the observation deck of the empire state building and i have some prepared remarks here but before i begin them, i just want to point out today there will be 32 more families that know the pain and horror that you just heard here today. we pay a lot of attention, and appropriately so, to these mass shootings, the one that andre's son miraculously survived, but we also have to be aware that this happens in our nation every day and as you're going to hear today, as a nation, we are better than this. i want to thank you all for coming on what we are confident is a momentous day in the history of this issue. we have people here from all over the country from utah, california, from colorado, and connecticut. we're here because we love our children, our husbands, our wives, our brothers, and our sisters. we mourn them and we wish they hadn't been shot. we're here as a testament to our love
river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our house in connecticut sometimes i would stop and see him. and we would discuss politics and some of the things that had not been discussable before. >> did you ever get insight into watergate and how that happened? >> i think i got a little. for example, one time, this was probably in 1992 or thereabouts. he told me and he indicated that john mitchell thought so, too, that this book that was coming out, "silent coup" -- do you remember that one? that was probably some of what happened. he quoted mitchell inside the cover. they thought that this was sort of how it happened. so i got that sense from him. >> going back to your book on 1775, how did you pursue it? how did you research it? how did you have to go? >> i have been interested in the revolution since i was a little kid. i was probably eight or nine when i would make a list of generals. i did nothing that was heading for anything very useful, but i always enjoyed that. then, when i did "the cousins wars" in the 1990's, i did some research on the revolution. i can go back a
to -- leaving at least 88 dead. the tragedy in connecticut is described as indescribable. 16 of the mass shootings this year, including one in georgia at a korean health spa back in february. it goes through other incidents. jackson, tenn., at a nightclub. a high school in rural ohio. a psychiatric hospital in pittsburgh, pennsylvania. it goes on from there. we are talking about preventing shootings. is there a role for the government or society? what do you think? republican line, silver lake. caller, hello, c-span. -- caller: hello, c-span. it has to do with a lot of things. it sounds like this man at 20, he did not have a strong father figure in his life, which should have. there is so much of that going on in this country today. host: what does that mean for you, paul? caller: i have three boys. i have taken my son's hunting and we have been shooting firearms since they were seven. they have never regretted it or had any trouble. they are raised operate. i have a strong connection with my children. i hope that they do with their children as well. you have got an incident down there t
, connecticut, speaking to the community hit by friday's elementary school shootings. it's monday, december 17, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congressional democrats are vowing to push for stricter gun control laws. several democratic lawmakers called yesterday for a new push for gun restrictions, including a ban on military-style assault weapons in the wake of the connecticut massacre. democratic senator dianne feinstein is the author of an assault weapon
and in connecticut and not just this disaster but going back to 2011 and the catastrophe that connecticut suffered when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. i want the people to know that they have a real friend in the senator of louisiana. your leadership has been tremendous in this area. i want to briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership that he has in the wake of this disaster in connecticut. he prompely declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the s.p.a. to come along along with fema and the people on the ground that have been there for quite some time, many of the fema officials in advance of the storm. unfortunately, many of these recent storms and their scope and depth and the devastation they cause that we may face a new normal in this kind of catastrophic weather-related event. we need to prepare in the longer term as well as the short term that why the suggests made early this morning and other improvements will be made are so critically important. i think you need to know that the connecticut s.p.a. office has approved $6
in connecticut is outrageous and horrible. all of us are just very saddened. >> see the rest of this sequence -- segment at c-span.org. >> io am davejkeane president of the national rifle association and i would like to welcome you to begin our discussion of the topic that has been on the minds of american parents across this country. that is -- what do we do about the tragedy of the sort that struck in newtown, conn. to avoid such events in the future? like most americans, we were shocked by what happened. like all americans, we have been discussing all of the various options that are available to protect our children and, at this point, we would like to share our thinking with few. that purpose, i like to introduce wayne lapierre our executive vice president. at the end of this conference, we will not be taking questions that next week, we will be available to any of you who are interested in talking about these or other issues of interest. contact us, please, at that point, thank you very much. wayne? >> good morning. the national rifle association, 4 million others -- mothers, fathers, so
morning beginning with "the connecticut post." - you can see the flag remaining at half staff outside one of the churches in newtown, conn. following the burial of 20 children and six women killed about a week and a half ago. this is from the front page of today's "new york daily news." finally, from the front page is this report about what is ahead in terms of the gun control fight. we heard from the nra friday. let me read you a few sentences -- that was nearly 20 years ago in 1993. we will hear from that testimony in a couple of minutes. we want to get your calls and what is ahead in gun-control. roy is joining us from north carolina, the independent line, good morning. caller: it could be a bitter fight but i think some drastic action needs to be taken. it should be at least as burdensome for the gun owner as it is for a car owner. registration, insurance, testing, everything -- handguns are a big problem, too. i think it is so bad that the president should do some kind of executive order and put a moratorium on military rifles, at least, because around here in western north carolina,
is an independent from connecticut. caller: thank you for taking my call. i really like hillary clinton. i think she is a hard worker. i think her old man is a hard worker, too. whitewater was like three wars ago. that was a long time ago. i would like to see jeb bush run against hillary clinton. i think they can move our nation forward. host: if jeb bush -- if it is a bush-clinton race, for whom would you vote? caller: oh, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with
times -- or warwick, arizona, fort hood and now in connecticut. in 2008 he pledged i think that the dnc that he would keep ak- 47's out of criminal and an advocate it reinstating the assault weapons ban. what does the president say to americans in communities like when he visited yesterday why nothing more has happened yet? >> the president's support for reinstatement of the assault weapons ban has been the case ever since it expired, and has been true for the past several years. the fact is, we have taken steps to include background checks, which those at the issue preventing those that should not have guns from acquiring them. but as you heard the president said last night, we all need to do more. we must change. we must take more action and a greater action to address this problem. because we have not adequately, it in his view, -- in his view, of taking care of our first priority, and this case, taking care of our children. he committed himself, as you heard him last night say, to use the power of his office to help us bring about the change. and he will do that in a way that is inc
us on the democratic line from connecticut. caller: good morning. my question is, in watching c- span over the years, i noticed there was once an episode where an economist talked-about a world view on reducing the imprint of the military and using limited black ops and to intervene in situations to quell unrest in the discos along with the things like the economy -- this goes along with things like the economy. my question is how do you see us going black ops and the cia? is this not what we did in afghanistan? guest: i understand there is a very wrong perception among the public that all special ops do are black ops and unilateral raids in the dead of night. that perception is widely held. in the case of columbia, the philippines, yemen, these other places that i am talking about, the governments have invited special operations forces in to help them, to help their country's forces. that is why i think it is such an effective use in the long term. it does not cause the same political diplomatic controversy as many people know what happened after the bin laden rate. it was a huge rup
in the fiscal cliff negotiations? let's go first to bridgeport, connecticut. thanks for waiting. >> i was thinking the republicans should drop the cpi issue that they have been discussing. it seems to me that they're working on getting it worked our for the estate tax. >> the chain on the consumer price index was a point of contention raised on the house floor. the reporting from politico earlier about the loggerheads' this afternoon, they say that the provision would result in lower payments for social security beneficiaries. boston, the independent go ahead. >> most companies in the u.s. are now headquartered in toronto. they make their profit in bermuda. we're spending 47 cents on the dollar on the deficit. we will have to do like canada and put a tax on gasoline. what is your opinion? what should we do to fulfill the debt and our obligation? >> what is your opinion? you said you are tunisia. would it work in the united states? >> we have to tax the gasoline $2 a gallon. in canada, it is $2 a gallon for gasoline tax. they are balancing their budget. >> i am going to let you go. we
-up -- if you are poor, you'd have to spend a lot of energy to get enough to eat. john, connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. i was calling to mention low- quality food and the cost of health care, but you covered that well. do you think it would be more beneficial if they start doing a local farming program where they could start growing vegetables? maybe have some land with tiles -- cows and chickens, and local people could work on the farming areas and return the food to the communities as opposed to being so reliant on high-salt diets, the foods we would coin as having a long shelf life, leaving it on the shelf for six months without going bad? has the government been able to look into those programs, considering the finances involved in the program as a whole? host: thank you. a related topic -- the availability of this fresh produce is a big distraction for many. guest: there are some programs that speak directly to the point, one our farms-to-school programs, directed to help know where food is coming from and getting fresher food into the schools. in addition, we talk
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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